Photos

Luna undergoes major rehab in Boothbay Harbor, Maine

Click each picture for a fullsize view. (Some may take longer to display.)
 

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Stern Deck: To inspect and access the horn timber, the broad King Planks on the centerline of the tug’s stern deck were removed. This also required removal of the upper plates of the rudder stock bearing. The upper end of the rudder stock can be seen projecting above the deck, inside a lead tube.

Transverse floors can be seen and are in fairly good shape. These provided support to the hull and also carried the aft deck. The aft most transverse floor will be removed to permit improved access during the removal of the horn timber. Many of the deck beams running transversely beneath the deck are receiving attention: ten deck beams are being completely replaced; many deck beams ends are being repaired with scarfed sections.



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Apron Piece: The tug’s bow was extremely strong to push ships and barges. It consisted of outside vertical stem timber and vertical inner apron timbers. Here the finished apron piece rests in the carpenters shop awaiting installation at the stem. 

About 11 feet long, the piece weighs about 1,100 pounds. An iron-lifting fitting for the crane can be seen and will be removed. The upper end will then be shaped into the riding bitt or stem bitt as per the original design. The piece has a diagonal base to fit into the interlocking pattern of the upper and lower apron.



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Apron Space: This is where the apron piece will be placed.The old, rotted, and damaged apron has been removed and the space cleared. Once installed, a similar stem piece will be fabricated and fitted ahead of it to form the most forward structure of the tug.



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Luna Under Wraps: The Luna is protected from the elements by a plastic structure that envelops it. A frame was built from the sides of the marine railway to the edge of the deckhouse to create the main roof, with additional structure to cover the pilothouse. The platform of the marine railway is solid and forms the floor. The masts of the Luna have been lowered to reduce windage and permit them to be wrapped.

An oil-fired furnace is located on the forward end of the railway platform with a duct system to carry hot air to both sides of the space. Scaffolding with handrails surrounds the tug at main deck, connected to the railway platform by a steel staircase with treads and handrails. The space is bright and spacious. Electric lights permit work during dawn and dusk, and illuminate work surfaces. Electric power is carried into the space to power hand-tools.



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Hull Planking Fastenings: The Luna's hull planking is secured by a combination of locust trunnel pegs which extend through the planking, framing, and ceiling, and spikes, bronze below the waterline and galvanized iron above the waterline. The planking seams are horizontal and the planking butt is vertical, aligned with a frame. These seams have been reefed with handtools and circular power saws fitted with special blades to remove all of the old caulking material and provide a clean space for new caulking.

This photo shows original material. The white oak planking has been sanded and power disced, which has removed a small depth of old, rough surface. The trunnels are so sound that the original wedges that were driven into them to broaden their ends and secure them are clearly visible. The bronze spike heads seen here are square-headed and sit within wood that has been slightly stained over 70 years by the tarnishing of the spikes. Wood near spikes was disced rather than planed because the spikes would damage power planes.

This is a view of the mid port quarter bow area. In Febuary, the entire surviving hull planking was coated with linseed oil to prevent the planking from drying out and shrinking, which would have caused overly wide seams for caulking. If seams are too wide, the subsequent swelling upon immersion in water can make recaulking difficult and less effective, particularly when the seam closes and cracks the outside sealing cement.

 

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